The Perfect Match: Energy Efficient Building Envelope and Mini-Splits for the HVAC System

HVACMany builders and designers are realizing the energy efficiencies of using SIPs for the envelope of the structures they are building and designing.  An issue that keeps popping up when using SIPs for the envelope is what to do about the HVAC system.  SIPs are so energy efficient that the required HVAC loads are coming in below what conventional forced air systems supply.  This means that if a forced air system is used it will be inefficient because it will short cycle.  Passive house designs are having similar issues.

Thankfully there are options to this conundrum.  Enter mini-splits.  Read more here which describes an option from one manufacturer as featured on Builder Online. Using mini-splits to supply the heating and cooling needs of the energy efficient SIP envelope is a match made in heaven.

QUESTIONS

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

Streamline Building Projects to Alleviate Labor Shortages

NAHB June 2014 Labor Chart

Survey for the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index, June 2014

Although construction and housing markets are recovering from the recession, finding and hiring workers continue to be a key challenge for builders. (see NAHB industry survey:  Labor Shortages Are A Key Issue for Housing).  As the labor shortages are becoming a major impact on the construction industry, many builders are seeking alternatives.

Streamlining project builds is the first step in reducing build times and costs.  Advanced building methods are gaining traction as a practical solution for residential and commercial construction because they take a fraction of the time to put up and have enormous benefits in terms of strength, durability and energy efficiency.

Meet SIPs:  Structural Insulated Panels.  Perhaps the most advanced framing method, SIP panels come pre-fabricated, pre-cut, and pre-insulated per floor plans, and don’t require special training for framing installation.  SIPs have continuous, high-thermal insulation across their height, width and depth, and since they don’t have studs that break up the insulation, they reduce thermal bridging.

With just one experienced foreman and a few less experienced laborers working together yield cost effective labor production rates due to how panels are assembled (much like a puzzle, slide the lightweight pieces together by a numbered installation guide specific to each project).

SIPs incorporate structure and insulation into one assembly, not only providing continuous insulation but also resulting in fewer gaps to seal.

SIPs incorporate structure and insulation into one assembly, not only providing continuous insulation but also resulting in fewer gaps to seal.

SIPs can improve efficiency by meeting multiple building needs in one step.  SIPs accomplish multiple goals, you can take care of five steps with this one product:  framing, sheathing, insulation, vapor and sound control according to Frank McNeil, a builder with Vail associates.  This removes the need for separate work and the labor that goes with it.

In addition to solving the labor shortage issues, builders who choose to frame with SIPs may also pocket more on their bottom line, both because of fewer framing hours on the job (speed of construction), reduced loan interest to pay, and for offering a better engineered product (think energy efficiency for the end owner).

 

Learn more about SIPs:

QUESTIONS:

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

The homebuilding method you’ve never heard of that cuts energy bills up to 60 percent

Originally published by Brandpoint Newspaper

brandpointFor people building new homes in the coming months, the ever-increasing pain of monthly utility bills for cooling and heating their homes has them looking for more energy-efficient construction methods. In 2014, homeowners have been burdened with electricity costs that rose 5 percent, heating oil 7 percent and natural gas 10 percent, as reported in USA Today.  At the same time, homebuilders are challenged to meet increasingly stringent energy codes imposed by cities and counties.

Most homes in North America are built using a technique that has remained essentially unchanged for more than a century. So-called “stick construction” using hundreds of pieces of lumber is notoriously difficult to make energy efficient. The problem is, numerous gaps in the structure provide paths for heated air to leak out and insulation in such homes tends to be spotty, rather than continuous across walls and ceilings.

To overcome these limitations, more builders and homeowners are using an advanced building product called structural insulated panels (SIPs). The panels are made of a rigid insulating foam core that has stiff wood panels laminated to it. SIPs are engineered to be stronger than stick construction, and are much more energy efficient.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reports that SIP buildings are about 15 times more air tight than stick construction. “A SIP house has fewer joints, less complicated interfaces between conditioned and unconditioned spaces, and it is dramatically easier to make it tight,” says Sam Rashkin, the former national director of DOE’s Energy Star for Homes program.

A key reason SIP-built homes have far fewer gaps is that the panels come in large sections – up to 8 feet by 24 feet. They also have continuous insulation across the height, width and depth of each panel. As a result, SIP homeowners enjoy up to 60 percent energy cost savings from both heating and cooling their homes.

“Everyone is so amazed by the energy efficiency SIPs provide,” says Scott Bergford, a DOE Energy Value Housing Award Builder of the Year, based in Olympia, Wash. “It only costs an average of $200 to $300 a year to heat one of my homes. That’s anywhere from one-fifth to one-sixth the typical costs for this region, so the savings are pretty significant, and the homeowners love that.”

In addition to energy savings, SIPs create a comfortable indoor environment and help support healthy indoor air by sealing out common pollutants. Green-minded homeowners also appreciate that building with the panels reduces construction waste by up to two-thirds.

Despite the wide range of benefits, SIPs generally cost about the same as stick construction, considering that they enable faster home construction and reduce disposal costs from building scraps.

“This is the future of homebuilding,” says licensed engineer Joe Pasma, technical director for Premier SIPs. “SIPs provide homebuilders a simple and affordable way to meet evolving energy code requirements, while building better homes that people enjoy living in.”

Some homeowners might worry that choosing SIPs will mean a cookie-cutter looking home. Yet, builders can easily adapt the panels to virtually any architectural style for single-family homes or apartments. Builders have used SIPs for designs ranging from ultra-modern contemporary homes, to bungalows – even for Pueblo-style homes in New Mexico and high-end cabins in the Pacific Northwest.

QUESTIONS:

 

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

The Science Behind SIPs

Before you start comparing numbers, you need to determine the true energy efficiency of your building envelope.  A building’s energy efficiency is more than just an insulation’s tested R-value.  The whole-wall R-value is a more accurate measurement of real-world performance compared to the insulation’s R-value alone.  Many studies show a building’s airtightness has more of an impact on energy efficiency than these popular terms.  Premier SIPs help reduce energy consumption, lower construction waste, support healthier indoor air quality and create a more comfortable living and working environment.  The clear advantage of building with Premier SIPs is a stronger, advanced construction product with fewer impacts on the environment.

Airtightness in SIPs vs Stick Framed Construction

sips_stickframehomeIn a study by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, two identical test rooms were built side by side.  One stick-framed, one SIP-framed.  Rooms were tested for air infiltration and the SIP room was FIFTEEN times more airtight, and more energy efficient than the stick-framed room.  This alone illustrates how critical airtightness is to a building’s energy efficiency.  The science behind air infiltration in framing products explains the key types of air movements and their effect on energy efficiency.

Air Transfer

SIPS, Air Transfer

SIPS, Air Transfer

Air leaks through joints in sheathing and the inevitable gaps between lumber connections and between wood framing and the insulation.  SIPs dramatically reduce air transfer within walls and roofs by minimizing these joints and by providing solid, continuous insulation across each panel’s height, width and depth.

SIPs can be manufactured up to 8′ x 24′ without joints in the OSB, whereas traditional stick-framed sheathing is typically only 4′ wide.  Air can also leak through electrical and plumbing holes that are drilled in lumber studs.

Airtightness

The airtightness of a SIPs home has been repeatedly confirmed with blower door tests.  In fact, Energy Star does not require a blower door test for SIPs homes to earn the Energy Star rating.

Convective Looping

As warm air rises and cold air sinks in a conventionally framed wall cavity, a natural phenomenon called thermal or convective looping occurs, wasting valuable energy.  Unless the insulation is a solid material to stop this air movement, it doesn’t matter what the insulation’s R-value is.  What good is insulation if heat-carrying air can flow thought it and the cavities in the wall?  SIPs’ solid insulation core helps eliminate this.

Thermal Bridging

infared

TOP: Stick walls transfer heat though studs (indicated in yellow). BOTTOM: SIPs dramatically reduce Thermal Bridging in walls as shown with solid green walls.

Thermal bridging occurs where there is a continuos element (such as studs within traditionally framed walls, and studs within traditionally framed walls, and stud-to-siding connections) between the cold and warm faces of a wall.  These wood elements form a bridge between the inside and outside that can allow heat or cold to pass through by conduction.  Simply installing R-19 batt insulation in a stick wall doesn’t mean the whole wall will have a R-19 R-value because there is still a significant amount of thermal bridging in traditionally framed stick walls.

Stick-framed buildings rely on lumber at regular intervals to provide structural support.  15-25% of the shell of a stick-framed home is lumber, compared to as little as 3% in the shell of a typical SIP framed home.

Whole Wall R-value (Energy Efficiency)

When all of these factors are considered, it makes sense that the ORNL’s whole wall R-value tests showed the following R-values for SIP versus stick-framed buildings:

whole wall r-value_ORNL

 

QUESTIONS:

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

Project Profile: Mixed Income Senior Apartments

As part of the Structural Insulated Panel Association (SIPA) Building Excellence Awards, one of Community Development Programs Center of Nevada’s mixed income senior apartments received recognition for the projects’ innovation and environmental sustainability. The annual competition selects the top SIPs projects in eight categories.  Read more on what Premier SIPs projects brought home awards.

PROJECT PROFILE:   Mixed Income Senior Apartments  |  Las Vegas, NV  |  View Project Profile (pdf)

2014 SIPA Building Excellence Award Recipient for Best Multi-Family Project.

"We have used SIPs on our last 9 projects and will never go back to conventional framing.  There are never problems with the walls not being straight, like we faced in stick frame construction.  We also pay all of the utilities on all our SIP projects and we have found great cost savings of power, especially in the summer months of Las Vegas."  - Sandra Bullock, CDPCN

“We have used SIPs on our last 9 projects and will never go back to conventional framing. There are never problems with the walls not being straight, like we faced in stick frame construction. We also pay all of the utilities on all our SIP projects and we have found great cost savings of power, especially in the summer months of Las Vegas.”  -Sandra Bullock, CDPCN

Developer Frank Hawkins of Community Development Programs Center of Nevada (CDPCN) is a nonprofit corporation that seeks to promote community and economic development and affordable housing in the state of Nevada.  CDPCN has been working to revitalize parts of Las Vegas for years.  As the builder, developer, and owner of their projects, they needed to use materials and methods that would reduce their building and operating costs in order to keep the units affordable.  Critical to this goal is keeping energy costs low in the occupied units since CDPCN itself pays all utility bills.

SIPs are strong.  You can't damage them as easily as conventional framing."  - Sandra Bullock, CDPCN

SIPs are strong. You can’t damage them as easily as conventional framing.” – Sandra Bullock, CDPCN

This is CDPCN’s 9th affordable housing project that Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) have been utilized, a 3-story apartment building housing 81 one and two-bedroom units.  Premier SIPs offer regular savings of time, labor and construction waste.  The building owners pay all building utilities and found the savings of energy costs were significant over other types of frame structures, especially in the hot summer months.  SIPs also stand up well to the bumps and damage that can occur when families with small children regularly come and go in multifamily housing.

Structural engineering was extensively completed for this multi-story project with the help of Premier SIPs consultants and Structural Engineers that are extremely experienced with SIPs design and construction.

Other energy efficient materials used on this project include:  solar panels, low E windows, tankless hot water heaters, low VOC paint and ceramic tile throughout.

All multi-family complexes Frank Hawkins owns that have utilized SIPs exceed ENERGY STAR requirements.

PROJECT DETAILS:

Read past articles written on CDPCN’s Las Vegas Mixed Income projects built with SIPs:

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Are All SIPs Created Equal?

A GUIDE TO ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS WHEN COMPARING SIP SYSTEMS

SIPs can be a major structural component of the overall structural system of a building.  Since SIPs are recognized on a limited basis by the IRC it is important to make sure your SIP supplier has a code report that was developed by an approved listing agency.  The listing agency’s report helps demonstrate code compliance to building officials and design professionals.

Here are some important factors to consider and questions to ask when considering various SIP suppliers and their available code reports:

Audubon Visitors Center (ND), Premier SIPs

Audubon Visitors Center (ND), Premier SIPs

1.  Do you have references I could contact?

During your research, ask both building owners and builders about their experiences with the SIP manufactures you are considering.  If you don’t know of anyone who has used SIPs before then ask the manufacturer for references for installers, builders, or design professionals.  You can even visit a local job site to see SIPs in action.  It’s very important to choose a SIP manufacturer who will work with you to identify potential cost savings, early in the design process, and stand behind the product after it’s been delivered.  The value you will receive by working with an experienced SIP supplier will save you valuable time and money on the job site.

Amavi Winery (WA), Premier SIPs

Amavi Winery (WA), Premier SIPs

2.  Do you have an up to date code report?

Without a current code report your local building department may not allow construction to continue, or they may require additional structure to be added to your project.  A code report ensures that the SIPs are manufactured and third party tested to verify that they can support the loads that will be applied over the lifetime of the structure.  Ask to see a Code Report and engineering design manual with axial, transverse and diaphragm data.  An engineer will require this information to design a SIP structure.

3.  Are you compliant with the building code required for your project?

Check to see what your building department requires in your area.  If a SIP supplier doesn’t meet this specification then there is a good possibility that the building department won’t allow the use of that material.

Thatcher School (CA), Premier SIPs

Thatcher School (CA), Premier SIPs

4.  Can your SIPs be used in Seismic zone “D” areas (if applicable)?

Check to make sure the SIPs you are looking at using can be used as shear walls in Seismic Zones D, E and F.  If not, stick framed shear walls will be required.

5.  Will the SIPs have a continuous insulated foam core with minimal lumber?

Installing lumber within the panels will increase the structural capacity of the SIPs.  If the testing data is limited or unavailable, some manufacturers code reports will require double 2x lumber to be installed 4′ on center.  This is equivalent to building a stick frame wall with studs 24″ on center.  Most manufacturers don’t supply lumber so this can be a significant increase in material costs, decrease the energy efficiency of the building, and increase panel installation labor.  This is an important point to consider because the estimate that SIP suppliers will present may not label what type of panels will be required and it’s possible that you will have to supply additional lumber for the panels.

Scammon Bay School (AK), Premier SIPs

Scammon Bay School (AK), Premier SIPs

6.  How long do you warranty R-Value and Lamination?

Not all foam cores will maintain the same R-value over the life of the structure.  The two most popular SIP cores are Polyurethane and EPS.  Polyurethane panel cores will “off-gas” and the R-value will degrade over time.  Usually the R-value that is published by the manufacturer is the optimal R-value right after manufacture.  Find out what the R-value will become several years down the road, and what R-value is referenced in the panel warranty.  EPS panel cores will not off-gas and decrease R-value over time, but they will probably have lower published R-values than polyurethane.  SIP thickness can be increased to meet whatever R-value you require.  For more on R-values and energy efficiency see “The Premier Advantage” brochure.

7.  Does your code report provide testing data for SIP headers?

Loft at McKinley (AZ), Premier SIPs

Loft at McKinley (AZ), Premier SIPs

If testing hasn’t been performed on the SIPs with window and door openings then you’ll be required by the building code to install lumber headers above the openings.  This will require multiple pieces of lumber to be installed from the top of the wall to the foundation to support those headers.  If your SIP manufacturer has header testing, then they can often provide a continuous panel with a hole cut out for the opening.  This significantly reduces lumber installation and thermal bridging.

8.  Do you pre-fabricate the SIPs?

One of the largest advantages to SIP buildings is how quickly they can be assembled.  SIP suppliers who have CNC equipment to cut the panels according to your floor plans will be far more accurate and efficient then cutting panels to fit in the field.  Check to see if the SIP manufacturer has the ability to create a 3D computer model of your structure.  This will help ensure that the angles and cuts will be manufactured accurately.

Rocky Peak Village (CO), Premier SIPs

Rocky Peak Village (CO), Premier SIPs

9.  Do you have testing for all thicknesses and sizes of SIPs?

Make sure that the SIP manufacturer’s code report supports the thickness of the panels that you require.  If not you’ll end up installing lumber within the panels equivalent to what would be required with a stick frame system.  What’s the point of going with SIPs if you need to use as much lumber as you would in a stick frame structure?

10.  Can you manufacturer up to 8′x24′ “Jumbo” panels?

Bigger = Quicker and more energy efficient.  Larger panels can be more difficult to maneuver on the job site, but they are a lot quicker to install.  Perhaps the most time consuming factors in installing SIPs is not erecting hte panels, but the labor required to install the mastic sealant on the seams and nailing panel splines together around the entire perimeter of the panels.  Consider the seams and labor for:

- 192 square feet of (1) 8×24 panel with 64′ of panel perimeter and 128 nails

- 192 square feet of (6) 4×8 panels with 144′ of panel perimeter and 288 nails

Premier SIPs Resources

Premier SIPs Technical Bulletins

Premier SIPs Specifications

Premier SIPs Code Reports

Premier SIPs Details

Premier Advantage

SIP QUESTIONS

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

Ask The Expert: Can SIPs Be Used Moist Climates?

Originally published on Facility Management’s Weekly Ask the Expert Series (2013)

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

When asking if structural insulated panels (SIPs) work in wet, rainy, humid and/or cold climates, the underlying question is, “can I build with wood in this type of climate?” Almost always, the answer is “yes.”

You’ll find stick-framed buildings from the Louisiana Gulf Coast to above the Arctic Circle in Alaska. Likewise, SIPs can be used in demanding climates. Similar to any wood-based building product, the key is proper flashing to keep water out of the building envelope, and sealing joints to prevent leakage of warm, moist air into and out of the wall and roof assemblies.

Numerous commercial and institutional buildings demonstrate the effectiveness of SIP construction in wet and cold climates. Examples include:

  • George Morgan High School, Kalskag, Alaska (a community that averages 60 inches of snow per year and regularly experiences sub-zero temperatures)
  • Cody Cattle Company restaurant in Northern Wyoming near Yellowstone National Park
  • Little Big Horn College Health and Wellness Center on the high plains of Montana
  • Finn Hill Jr. High School, Kirkland, Washington (an area of suburban Seattle that receives 39 inches of rain annually)
  • Portland Community College Newberg Center, Newberg, Oregon (an AIA Committee on the Environment [COTE] 2012 Top Ten Green Project – located in rainy western Oregon)

The reason the question about climate comes up with SIPs, is a perception that the oriented strand board (OSB) sheathing in the panels is at risk for water damage. SIPs are manufactured with OSB that has an Exposure 1 bond rating according to the APA. The bond classification relates to the ability of the glue bond to resist moisture and thus to the structural integrity of the OSB. Exposure 1 rated materials are permitted where temporary exposure, such as construction delays, occur prior to providing protection that leads to dry end-use conditions.

To some people, SIPs have a “gee-whiz” futuristic aura, but the panels have been analyzed extensively in laboratory tests and proven to be durable in real-world installations for several decades.

The choice to use SIPs is often driven by two things: energy efficiency and the need for speed. SIPs have monolithic insulation and fewer gaps to seal than other construction methods, so they dramatically reduce a building’s heating and cooling energy consumption – up to 60%. The panels are now common in net-zero energy schools and other ultra energy-efficient buildings. Building professionals also use SIPs to deliver projects quickly while achieving high quality. For example, in Las Vegas contractors cut the framing schedule for a 70,000 square-foot elementary school from 121 days to 47 days (a 60% time savings).

The 2013 construction season is shaping up to be especially challenging for completing projects under tight turn-around. Many experienced laborers that contractors counted on have found other jobs, leaving framers with untrained workers. This will be a big problem for school districts that have to finish new buildings in time for the start of fall classes. SIPs provide a good way around this limitation since SIP framing contractors can have crews comprised of one experienced foreman and two or three less-experienced laborers, yet still install the panels quickly and accurately.

As with any building system, when using SIPs it’s not enough to throw them up and hope for the best. Following are some key points to keep in mind to prevent water intrusion into the building envelope and block the flow of humid air through the panel joints (for additional details, see the article “Tight, but Not Uptight“).

Just like other wall and roof assemblies, it is crucial to protect the building envelope in SIP construction from water accumulation. The International Building Code (IBC) requires flashing, a weather-resistant barrier and a means of draining to the exterior any water that enters the assembly.

With SIP walls, commonly used weather-resistive barriers include synthetic weather barriers and building wraps.

In SIP roof assemblies, synthetic, breathable roofing underlayments provide an alternative to traditional No. 15 and No. 30 felts. Like a quality rain jacket, breathable underlayments allow water vapor to pass up and out, yet keep bulk water out. This can be especially beneficial when the OSB skins of SIP roof panels have been exposed to precipitation during construction.

Although the techniques to protect SIPs from water are similar to those used with other building envelope assemblies, with SIPs, crews must be mindful of properly sealing all joints between panels. This is not hard, as easy-to-apply mastics and tapes are used to block air and vapor transmission. In some instances, a code mandated vapor retarder might also be required – check with your local building official and SIP manufacturer for details.

Have a specific SIP question you would like answered, contact Joe today.

SIP QUESTIONS

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

Constructing a Successful Building Envelope

Originally aired on Commercial Conversation Radio

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

For this 18th Commercial Conversation, we are joined by Joe Pasma of Premier SIPS, Puyallup, WA, division of Carlisle Construction Materials. Joe is a professional engineer and technical manager at Premier SIPS. He has 35 years of experience in the building industry and specializes in high-performance building systems. His background includes structural engineering, product development and application of building science principles. Our discussion with Joe focuses on building envelope trends, technology, codes, and the role of structured insulated panels in producing an energy-efficient envelope system. We also talk about the roles of the HVAC and building-automation systems in creating a living, breathing building.  Click here to listen to the podcast mp3 file.

To learn more about building-envelope technology and structured insulated panels, use the following resources:

QUESTIONS:

Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS Technical Manager

Contact Joe Pasma, PE, Premier SIPS’ Technical Manager

800.469.8870 x104

joe.pasma@premiersips.com

Ask Joe to Connect With You on LinkedIn | Follow Premier SIPS on LinkedIn

Read more on Premiersips.com

Project Profile: Commercial Facility Meets Energy Requirements with SIPs

As part of the Structural Insulated Panel Association (SIPA) Building Excellence Awards, Pearl Izumi North American Headquarters received multiple recognitions for the projects’ innovation and environmental sustainability.  The annual competition selects the top SIPs projects in eight categories.  Read more on what Premier SIPs projects brought home awards.

PROJECT PROFILE:   Pearl Izumi U.S.A Corporate Headquarters  |  Louisville, CO  |  View Project Profile (pdf)

2014 SIPA Building Excellence Award Recipient for Best Commercial and Best Overall Project.

Premier SIPs construction reduced framing time and helped the facility to easily meet the 2012 Colorado energy requirements.

Premier SIPs construction reduced framing time and helped the facility to easily meet the 2012 Colorado energy requirements.

The new Pearl Izumi North American headquarters is a high-performance space to explore new ideas and innovation.  This designer and manufacture of upscale biking, triathlon and running gear moved into its new environmentally friendly building in December of 2013.  The 56,000 sq. ft. facility houses research and design, prototyping and testing, marketing, management and financial functions for the corporation.

frontThe industrial styled building uses natural materials chosen to integrate the building into the natural landscape and the facility’s Rocky Mountain views.  The 56,000 sq. ft. building achieved dramatic energy savings by using 10-inch-thick SIP wall panels and 10-inch-thick SIP roof panels for an airtight building envelope.

The open plan for construction offers design efficiency and enables Pearl Izumi to take advantage of day lighting, solar orientation and natural ventilation strategies that helps create a comfortable work environment for this corporate work space.  Exposed SIPs lent perfectly to the building’s industrial design that flows throughout the entire facility.

PROJECT DETAILS

SIPs construction enabled the design of the building and the workspaces to be open, collaborative and grouped by division.

SIPs construction enabled the design of the building and the workspaces to be open, collaborative and grouped by division.

Commercial Projects Save Operating Costs with SIPs

Economical to Operate:  Tight Building envelope reduces heating and cooling costs by up to 60%, offering significant savings on operating costs as well as greatly reduced mechanical equipment needs.

Fast Installation:  Large, pre-cut structural panels allow building envelope to be erected 50% faster enabling businesses to open sooner.

Healthy & Comfortable:  Better indoor air quality, and more comfortable operating environment, SIPs buildings stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.

Design Flexibility:  Virtually any Type V design can accommodate SIPs.

Environmentally Responsible:  SIPs typically produce 30% less job-site waste than traditional construction and by nature of the materials used, reduce the burden on our natural resources.

LEED Points:  Up to 44 credits could be awarded for use of Premier SIPs in commercial new construction or major renovation.

 

View Project Profile (pdf)

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Building Made Easy: Residential Time Lapse Video

Building systems with an acceleration advantage is key these days for builders and developers. With the horrendous winter, labor shortages and the improving economy… construction teams are wanting to get projects up easy and quick.  With the many alternative building methods being tested, Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) have proven benefits time after time:  fast installation with no special training for framing installation needed, multiple building needs all in one step…all while providing an energy efficient building for your client.

See for yourself, the below video documents SIPs being installed at a residential project in Globe, Arizona.  The SIPs arrive to the project site pre-fabricated, pre-cut and pre-insulated per floor plans.   The panels are assembled together (like a puzzle) by a numbered installation guide specific to each project.  Construction waste?  Not much…as you can see on the video there is much less waste to send to the landfills.

  • Project Location:  Globe, AZ
  • Project Size: 2,000 sq. ft. house with a 672 sq. ft. garage
  • SIPs used: 6″ Walls, 10″Roof

More on building with SIPS:

QUESTIONS

Contact Phil Ligon  |  AZ, NM, TX, UT Rep

phil.ligon@premiersips.com

Ask me to connect on LinkedIn

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